1. http://www.euro-pc.ro/scaune

    Rupeti monotonia, faceti combinatii indraznete, potrivite unor spatii diverse: birouri, locuinte, sali de prezentare, agentii de publicitate/design, spatii de primire, cabinete de cosmetica, baruri etc. Prin culoare va puteti exprima mai bine personalitatea.

    (Source : mayahan)

  2. neurosciencestuff:

Brain Development in Schizophrenia Strays from the Normal Path
Schizophrenia is generally considered to be a disorder of brain development and it shares many risk factors, both genetic and environmental, with other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability.
The normal path for brain development is determined by the combined effects of a complex network of genes and a wide range of environmental factors.
However, longitudinal brain imaging studies in both healthy and patient populations are required in order to map the disturbances in brain structures as they emerge, i.e., the disturbed trajectories of brain development.
A new study by an international, collaborative group of researchers has measured neurodevelopment in schizophrenia, by studying brain development during childhood and adolescence in people with and without this disorder. With access to new statistical approaches and long-term follow-up with participants, in some cases over more than a decade, the researchers were able to describe brain development patterns associated with schizophrenia.
"Specifically, this paper shows that parts of the brain’s cortex develop differently in people with schizophrenia," said first author Dr. Aaron F. Alexander-Bloch, from the National Institute of Mental Health.
"The mapping of the path that the brain follows in deviating from normal development provides important clues to the underlying causes of the disorder," said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.
The findings were derived by investigating the trajectory of cortical thickness growth curves in 106 patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia and a comparison group of 102 healthy volunteers.
Each participant, ranging from 7–32 years of age, had repeated imaging scans over the course of several years. Then, using over 80,000 vertices across the cortex, the researchers modeled the effect of schizophrenia on the growth curve of cortical thickness.
This revealed differences that occur within a specific group of highly-connected brain regions that mature in synchrony during typical development, but follow altered trajectories of growth in schizophrenia.
"These findings show a relationship between the hypothesis that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder and the longstanding hypothesis – first articulated by the German anatomist Karl Wernicke in the late 19th century – that it is a disease of altered connectivity between regions of the brain," added Alexander-Bloch.
This theoretical consistency is important, as it allows researchers to better focus future studies of brain connectivity in schizophrenia, by targeting the brain regions known to be affected.

    neurosciencestuff:

    Brain Development in Schizophrenia Strays from the Normal Path

    Schizophrenia is generally considered to be a disorder of brain development and it shares many risk factors, both genetic and environmental, with other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability.

    The normal path for brain development is determined by the combined effects of a complex network of genes and a wide range of environmental factors.

    However, longitudinal brain imaging studies in both healthy and patient populations are required in order to map the disturbances in brain structures as they emerge, i.e., the disturbed trajectories of brain development.

    A new study by an international, collaborative group of researchers has measured neurodevelopment in schizophrenia, by studying brain development during childhood and adolescence in people with and without this disorder. With access to new statistical approaches and long-term follow-up with participants, in some cases over more than a decade, the researchers were able to describe brain development patterns associated with schizophrenia.

    "Specifically, this paper shows that parts of the brain’s cortex develop differently in people with schizophrenia," said first author Dr. Aaron F. Alexander-Bloch, from the National Institute of Mental Health.

    "The mapping of the path that the brain follows in deviating from normal development provides important clues to the underlying causes of the disorder," said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.

    The findings were derived by investigating the trajectory of cortical thickness growth curves in 106 patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia and a comparison group of 102 healthy volunteers.

    Each participant, ranging from 7–32 years of age, had repeated imaging scans over the course of several years. Then, using over 80,000 vertices across the cortex, the researchers modeled the effect of schizophrenia on the growth curve of cortical thickness.

    This revealed differences that occur within a specific group of highly-connected brain regions that mature in synchrony during typical development, but follow altered trajectories of growth in schizophrenia.

    "These findings show a relationship between the hypothesis that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder and the longstanding hypothesis – first articulated by the German anatomist Karl Wernicke in the late 19th century – that it is a disease of altered connectivity between regions of the brain," added Alexander-Bloch.

    This theoretical consistency is important, as it allows researchers to better focus future studies of brain connectivity in schizophrenia, by targeting the brain regions known to be affected.

  3. neurosciencestuff:

EEG Study Findings Reveal How Fear is Processed in the Brain
An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Understanding how threat is processed in a normal brain versus one altered by PTSD is essential to developing effective interventions. 
New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published online today in Brain and Cognition illustrates how fear arises in the brain when individuals are exposed to threatening images. This novel study is the first to separate emotion from threat by controlling for the dimension of arousal, the emotional reaction provoked, whether positive or negative, in response to stimuli. Building on previous animal and human research, the study identifies an electrophysiological marker for threat in the brain.
“We are trying to find where thought exists in the mind,” explained John Hart, Jr., M.D., Medical Science Director at the Center for BrainHealth. “We know that groups of neurons firing on and off create a frequency and pattern that tell other areas of the brain what to do. By identifying these rhythms, we can correlate them with a cognitive unit such as fear.”
Utilizing electroencephalography (EEG), Dr. Hart’s research team identified theta and beta wave activity that signifies the brain’s reaction to visually threatening images. 
“We have known for a long time that the brain prioritizes threatening information over other cognitive processes,” explained Bambi DeLaRosa, study lead author. “These findings show us how this happens. Theta wave activity starts in the back of the brain, in it’s fear center – the amygdala – and then interacts with brain’s memory center - the hippocampus – before traveling to the frontal lobe where thought processing areas are engaged. At the same time, beta wave activity indicates that the motor cortex is revving up in case the feet need to move to avoid the perceived threat.” 
For the study, 26 adults (19 female, 7 male), ages 19-30 were shown 224 randomized images that were either unidentifiably scrambled or real pictures. Real pictures were separated into two categories: threatening (weapons, combat, nature or animals) and non-threatening (pleasant situations, food, nature or animals). 
While wearing an EEG cap, participants were asked to push a button with their right index finger for real items and another button with their right middle finger for nonreal/scrambled items. Shorter response times were recorded for scrambled images than the real images. There was no difference in reaction time for threatening versus non-threatening images. 
EEG results revealed that threatening images evoked an early increase in theta activity in the occipital lobe (the area in the brain where visual information is processed), followed by a later increase in theta power in the frontal lobe (where higher mental functions such as thinking, decision-making, and planning occur). A left lateralized desynchronization of the beta band, the wave pattern associated with motor behavior (like the impulse to run), also consistently appeared in the threatening condition.
This study will serve as a foundation for future work that will explore normal versus abnormal fear associated with an object in other atypical populations including individuals with PTSD.

    neurosciencestuff:

    EEG Study Findings Reveal How Fear is Processed in the Brain

    An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Understanding how threat is processed in a normal brain versus one altered by PTSD is essential to developing effective interventions. 

    New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published online today in Brain and Cognition illustrates how fear arises in the brain when individuals are exposed to threatening images. This novel study is the first to separate emotion from threat by controlling for the dimension of arousal, the emotional reaction provoked, whether positive or negative, in response to stimuli. Building on previous animal and human research, the study identifies an electrophysiological marker for threat in the brain.

    “We are trying to find where thought exists in the mind,” explained John Hart, Jr., M.D., Medical Science Director at the Center for BrainHealth. “We know that groups of neurons firing on and off create a frequency and pattern that tell other areas of the brain what to do. By identifying these rhythms, we can correlate them with a cognitive unit such as fear.”

    Utilizing electroencephalography (EEG), Dr. Hart’s research team identified theta and beta wave activity that signifies the brain’s reaction to visually threatening images. 

    “We have known for a long time that the brain prioritizes threatening information over other cognitive processes,” explained Bambi DeLaRosa, study lead author. “These findings show us how this happens. Theta wave activity starts in the back of the brain, in it’s fear center – the amygdala – and then interacts with brain’s memory center - the hippocampus – before traveling to the frontal lobe where thought processing areas are engaged. At the same time, beta wave activity indicates that the motor cortex is revving up in case the feet need to move to avoid the perceived threat.” 

    For the study, 26 adults (19 female, 7 male), ages 19-30 were shown 224 randomized images that were either unidentifiably scrambled or real pictures. Real pictures were separated into two categories: threatening (weapons, combat, nature or animals) and non-threatening (pleasant situations, food, nature or animals). 

    While wearing an EEG cap, participants were asked to push a button with their right index finger for real items and another button with their right middle finger for nonreal/scrambled items. Shorter response times were recorded for scrambled images than the real images. There was no difference in reaction time for threatening versus non-threatening images. 

    EEG results revealed that threatening images evoked an early increase in theta activity in the occipital lobe (the area in the brain where visual information is processed), followed by a later increase in theta power in the frontal lobe (where higher mental functions such as thinking, decision-making, and planning occur). A left lateralized desynchronization of the beta band, the wave pattern associated with motor behavior (like the impulse to run), also consistently appeared in the threatening condition.

    This study will serve as a foundation for future work that will explore normal versus abnormal fear associated with an object in other atypical populations including individuals with PTSD.

  4. Stetoscop electronic Littmann model 3000

    (Source : youtube.com)

  5. Incaltaminte medicala-Medical shoes

    (Source : youtube.com)

  6. http://www.euro-pc.ro/Rolatoare

    Euro-Produse vă oferă mai multe tipuri de rolatoare pentru a veni în întâmpinarea nevoilor dumneavoastră: rolatoare cu două roți, rolatoare cu patru roți, rolatoare cu scaun si cos.

    Rolatoarele sunt destinate persoanelor active, dar care au dificultăți locomotorii și au nevoie de un punct de sprijin atunci când se deplasează. Rolatorul funcționează prin împingere și este special creat pentru persoanele care nu au suficientă forță în mâini pentru a ridica uncadru de mers.

    Rolatoarele oferite de magazinul Euro-Produse sunt echipate cu frâne pentru a oferi siguranță utilizatorului atunci când staționează. Atunci când utilizatorul obosește în timpuldeplasării, se poate așeza pe scaunul confortabil pentru a se odihni.

    Rolatoarele sunt confecționate din materiale de cea mai bună calitate, fie din aluminiu, fie din oțel. Acestea au un aspect plăcut, elegant și sunt foarte practice. Rolatoarele  se pliaza in vederea transportului sau depozitarii pentru a reduce volumul ocupat.

    Rolatoarele ocupă foarte puțin spațiu de depozitare și sunt ușor de transportat.

  7. http://www.euro-pc.ro/dispozitive-reabilitare

    http://www.euro-pc.ro/dispozitive-reabilitare

  8. http://www.euro-pc.ro/dispozitive-reabilitare

    Rolatoare cu roti.Rolatoarele sunt destinate persoanelor active, dar care au dificultăți locomotorii și au nevoie de un punct de sprijin atunci când se deplasează. Rolatorul funcționează prin împingere și este special creat pentru persoanele care nu au suficientă forță în mâini pentru a ridica un cadru de mers.Rolatoarele ocupă foarte puțin spațiu de depozitare și sunt ușor de transportat.

  9. smellslikecadaverine:

Cerebral contusion. Pathological changes in cerebral contusions are hemorrhage (at least small petechial hemorrhages on the surface of the cerebral cortex), edema and necrosis.
The term “contusion” only applies if the pia is intact, if it breaks it is called “laceration”.

    smellslikecadaverine:

    Cerebral contusion. Pathological changes in cerebral contusions are hemorrhage (at least small petechial hemorrhages on the surface of the cerebral cortex), edema and necrosis.

    The term “contusion” only applies if the pia is intact, if it breaks it is called “laceration”.

  10. ucsdhealthsciences:

Is colorectal cancer getting its butt kicked?
Among those over 50, the number of people with colon or rectal cancer plummeted 30 percent from 2001 to 2010, due to screening and removal of precancerous polyps, according to data published this week.
For those 65 and older, the decline in new colon cancer incidents was even more dramatic, dropping 7 percent a year during the three-year period from 2008 to 2010. 
A national coalition of cancer groups, organized by the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, now hopes to eliminate colorectal cancer as a major public health problem through an “80 percent by 2018” campaign, launched this week. The goal is to screen 80 percent of people over 50 by 2018.
“It is realistic for us to achieve this goal at UC San Diego,” said Samir Gupta, MD, an associate professor of clinical medicine and gastroenterologist at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. “We are in the midst of a coordinated effort between primary care physicians and gastroenterologists to optimize screening rates.
“To increase screening rates, we are reminding patients, who are not up to date, to get screened. This effort includes mailing patients invitations. Our main challenges are awareness and making sure patients are talking to their doctors about screening and when to get screened. The ‘ick factor’ is also probably significant.”
Colonoscopies are the primary means for detecting precancerous tumors early. For those who prefer non-invasive options, patients may request the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or guaiac fecal occult blood test, both of which have the endorsement of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
Virtual colonoscopy or CT colonoscopy has been endorsed by the American Cancer Society, but not all insurers cover the procedure and it still requires a bowel preparation.

    ucsdhealthsciences:

    Is colorectal cancer getting its butt kicked?

    Among those over 50, the number of people with colon or rectal cancer plummeted 30 percent from 2001 to 2010, due to screening and removal of precancerous polyps, according to data published this week.

    For those 65 and older, the decline in new colon cancer incidents was even more dramatic, dropping 7 percent a year during the three-year period from 2008 to 2010. 

    A national coalition of cancer groups, organized by the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, now hopes to eliminate colorectal cancer as a major public health problem through an “80 percent by 2018” campaign, launched this week. The goal is to screen 80 percent of people over 50 by 2018.

    “It is realistic for us to achieve this goal at UC San Diego,” said Samir Gupta, MD, an associate professor of clinical medicine and gastroenterologist at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. “We are in the midst of a coordinated effort between primary care physicians and gastroenterologists to optimize screening rates.

    “To increase screening rates, we are reminding patients, who are not up to date, to get screened. This effort includes mailing patients invitations. Our main challenges are awareness and making sure patients are talking to their doctors about screening and when to get screened. The ‘ick factor’ is also probably significant.”

    Colonoscopies are the primary means for detecting precancerous tumors early. For those who prefer non-invasive options, patients may request the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or guaiac fecal occult blood test, both of which have the endorsement of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Virtual colonoscopy or CT colonoscopy has been endorsed by the American Cancer Society, but not all insurers cover the procedure and it still requires a bowel preparation.

  11. usmlenotes:

Deep-vein-thrombosis-mnemonic!

    usmlenotes:

    Deep-vein-thrombosis-mnemonic!

  12. http://www.euro-pc.ro/Scaun-Masa-cosmetica-reflexoterapie
Scaun-Masa cosmetica reflexoterapie

 Scaunul tip masa cosmetica reflexoterapie poate fi folosita in sedintele de masaj, precum si in cele de reflexoterapie si cosmetica.
Scaunul tip masa este confectionat din piele ecologica rezistenta, de culoare alb-mat.
Manerele sunt moi si confortabile iar perna pentru gat se poate indeparta.
Partea de sprijin a picioarelor si spatarul sunt ajustabile.
Ca un plus, acest pat dispune de trei sertare pentru pastrarea in siguranta a instrumentelor.
Are inclus suport pentru rola de hartie.
    Culoare unica: Alb    Structura: Otel cu Inox    Grosimea buretelui - 10 cm    sarcina maxima statica: 900 kg    Sarcina maxima de lucru: 240 kg    Greutatea mesei : 30 kg
Instructiuni de utilizare in limba romana.Produs nou cu factura si garantie.Livrare in toata tara prin Transport Rapid.Produs cerificat Comunitatea Europeana (CE)

    http://www.euro-pc.ro/Scaun-Masa-cosmetica-reflexoterapie

    Scaun-Masa cosmetica reflexoterapie

     Scaunul tip masa cosmetica reflexoterapie poate fi folosita in sedintele de masaj, precum si in cele de reflexoterapie si cosmetica.

    Scaunul tip masa este confectionat din piele ecologica rezistenta, de culoare alb-mat.

    Manerele sunt moi si confortabile iar perna pentru gat se poate indeparta.

    Partea de sprijin a picioarelor si spatarul sunt ajustabile.

    Ca un plus, acest pat dispune de trei sertare pentru pastrarea in siguranta a instrumentelor.

    Are inclus suport pentru rola de hartie.

        Culoare unica: Alb
        Structura: Otel cu Inox
        Grosimea buretelui - 10 cm
        sarcina maxima statica: 900 kg
        Sarcina maxima de lucru: 240 kg
        Greutatea mesei : 30 kg

    Instructiuni de utilizare in limba romana.
    Produs nou cu factura si garantie.
    Livrare in toata tara prin Transport Rapid.
    Produs cerificat Comunitatea Europeana (CE)